Patient Education

TRANSITIONAL SURGICAL CARE would like to be your health care resource before and after yout orthopedic surgery. Feel free to ask your questions and share your concerns with us. We will work with you and your surgeon to develop a plan of care and treatment you need.

We welcome you to our company and look forward to caring for you.

TRANSITIONAL SURGICAL CARE cares for a full range of medical services including the following:

 

Minimally Invasive Total Hip Arthroplasty

Total hip arthroplasty is the complete replacement of a damaged hip with a prosthetic one. This surgery is performed to relieve pain and restore function to a hip deteriorated by osteoarthritis, rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis, avascular necrosis, congenital abnormalities or traumatic injury. Total hip arthroplasty involves replacing the entire diseased joint, composed of the natural ball and socket and its protective cartilage. The damaged joint is replaced with a prosthetic hip, usually made of a metal ball and a plastic socket. ...


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Joint Reconstruction and Replacement

Because joints are in constant use, they often wear out over time due to overuse or aging. Joint reconstruction or replacement may be required to relieve the resulting pain and restore function. Most joints in the body, including the neck, shoulders, elbows, wrists, hands, hips, knees, ankles and feet, are synovial, permitting movement and articulation. When these joints suffer traumatic injury, or when the cartilage that normally protects them wears away, surgical repair or replacement may be necessary. ...


Read More...

 

Mini-Incision Total Knee Replacement

A mini-incision total knee replacement, or arthroplasty, is a surgical procedure to replace a damaged, dysfunctional knee joint using minimally invasive techniques. The knee, being a weight-bearing joint, is especially prone to injury and degenerative disease. The knee is a hinge joint where the femur (thigh bone) and tibia (shin bone) meet. The patella (knee cap) glides over the femur when the knee moves. In a healthy joint, a layer of smooth cartilage cushions the bone ends, working together with muscles, tendons and ligaments to allow the knee to bend easily. ...


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Physical Therapy

Physical therapy is a treatment method for improving limited body movement and functionality that are a result of disease, injury or aging. Treatment involves restorative exercises that focus on developing muscle strength, flexibility, balance, posture and coordination, and that provide overall pain relief. Physical therapy is designed to promote a patient's overall health and fitness, prevent reinjury and maximize quality of life. It may be prescribed as an initial form of treatment for certain conditions or injuries, or to restore strength and function after surgery. ...


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Robotic Total Hip and Knee Replacement Surgery

 

Stryker’s MAKOplasty® surgery is designed to treat patients with certain conditions that result in pain in the knee or hip. According to its manufacturer, MAKO Surgical Corp., Stryker’s MAKOplasty system uses robotic-arm technology (RIO® Robotic Arm Interactive Orthopedic System) and "three-dimension high-definition visualization [to] guide the surgeon with visual, tactile and auditory feedback" during surgery. ...


Read More...

 

 

Anterior Hip Arthroplasty

 

 

Traditionally, hip arthroplasty, commonly known as hip replacement, has been performed by accessing the joint through the rear of the leg. Recent advances in technique, however, have made an anterior approach, during which the surgeon accesses the hip joint through the front of the leg, a more desirable option for most patients. ...


Read More...

 

 

Hip Fractures

 

 

 

A hip fracture is a break in the upper part of the thigh bone (femur) where the bone angles toward the hip joint. The hip is a "ball-and-socket" joint where the "ball" at the top of the thigh bone (femur) fits inside the "socket" of the pelvis (acetabulum). It allows the upper leg to bend and rotate. Most hip fractures are caused by falls or an injury from direct impact to the side of the hip. Hip fractures are more common in elderly adults as a result of osteoporosis or bones that have weakened over time. In addition to advanced age, factors such as certain medications, chronic medical conditions, or a history of heavy tobacco and alcohol use, may weaken bones and make individuals more susceptible to hip fractures. ...


Read More...

 

 

Rehabilitation After Hip Arthroplasty

 

 

Hip arthroplasty involves replacing part of the femur bone or hip socket with prosthetic devices. After surgery, a physical therapy program is created to help the patient regain flexibility, increase range of motion, and strengthen the hip and leg. The goal of physical therapy is to help patients to walk safely, without assistance, and eventually return them to all of their regular activities. ...


Read More...

 

 

Hip Procedures FAQs

 

 

As a weight-bearing ball and socket joint, the hip is prone to various ailments which may occur as a result of aging, traumatic injury or disease. Many of these require surgical intervention for diagnosis or repair.

What is hip arthroscopy?

Hip arthroscopy is a minimally invasive procedure used to diagnose and treat a wide range of conditions affecting the hip joint. During procedure, an arthroscope, a long flexible tube with a camera and a tiny light on the end, in inserted into a small incision in the hip. This device displays magnified images of the inside of the hip joint on a video monitor. This procedure can be used to confirm diagnoses with real-time observation. If any abnormalities are detected during the arthroscopy, they can corrected, using tiny surgical instruments, during the same procedure. ...


Read More...

 

 

Hip Arthroscopy

 

 

Hip arthroscopy is a minimally invasive procedure used to diagnose and treat a wide range of conditions affecting the hip joint. This procedure can be used to confirm the diagnosis of various imaging procedures, such as X-rays and MRIs, as it provides a three-dimensional, real-time image of the affected area. If damage or abnormalities are detected during the arthroscopy, repairs can often be made during the same procedure. ...


Read More...

 

 

Physical Therapy for Hip Conditions

 

 

 

For people experiencing pain, discomfort and limited mobility due to hip-related injuries or conditions, physical therapy may be beneficial in promoting hip function, strengthening the joint, and maximizing the patient's range of motion. For mild hip conditions, physical therapy may be sufficient to lubricate the joint, lessen pain, and ease mobility. Physical therapy is an important part of the rehabilitation process for individuals with hip-related conditions. ...


Read More...

 

 

Total Hip Resurfacing

 

 

Total hip resurfacing is a procedure that may be performed to treat patients who are suffering from advanced arthritis in the hip. During the process, only damaged cartilage is removed and a metal cap is placed over the ball portion of the hip. The procedure is similar to that of hip replacement surgery, but in a hip resurfacing, the femoral head and socket are not removed. Hip resurfacing is typically performed on young patients or patients with medical conditions that preclude full hip replacement surgery. ...


Read More...

 

 

Minimally Invasive Total Hip Arthroplasty

 

 

Total hip arthroplasty is the complete replacement of a damaged hip with a prosthetic one. This surgery is performed to relieve pain and restore function to a hip deteriorated by osteoarthritis, rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis, avascular necrosis, congenital abnormalities or traumatic injury. Total hip arthroplasty involves replacing the entire diseased joint, composed of the natural ball and socket and its protective cartilage. The damaged joint is replaced with a prosthetic hip, usually made of a metal ball and a plastic socket. ...


Read More...

 

 

Joint Reconstruction and Replacement

 

 

Because joints are in constant use, they often wear out over time due to overuse or aging. Joint reconstruction or replacement may be required to relieve the resulting pain and restore function. Most joints in the body, including the neck, shoulders, elbows, wrists, hands, hips, knees, ankles and feet, are synovial, permitting movement and articulation. When these joints suffer traumatic injury, or when the cartilage that normally protects them wears away, surgical repair or replacement may be necessary. ...


Read More...

 

 

Rehabilitation After Knee Arthroplasty

 

 

Physical therapy begins very soon after knee arthroplasty (replacement) is complete, and usually lasts for about 6 weeks. Patients are given analgesics to relieve postoperative pain sufficiently so that they can begin knee exercises as soon as possible. At first, they are encouraged to sit up and perform knee slides. Within days, or even hours, they are instructed to perform other exercises in order to regain muscle strength and flexibility. In addition, many patients are taught to use continuous passive motion devices. ...


Read More...

 

 

Physical Therapy FAQs

 

 

What is physical therapy?

Physical therapy is a treatment method for improving movement and functionality that have been compromised by age, disease or injury. Patients recover through the use of restorative exercises that focus on muscle strength, flexibility, balance, posture and coordination, and overall pain relief. Physical therapy is also designed to prevent reinjury and maximize patient quality of life. ...


Read More...


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Robotic Total Hip and Knee Replacement Surgery

Stryker’s MAKOplasty® surgery is designed to treat patients with certain conditions that result in pain in the knee or hip. According to its manufacturer, MAKO Surgical Corp., Stryker’s MAKOplasty system uses robotic-arm technology (RIO® Robotic Arm Interactive Orthopedic System) and "three-dimension high-definition visualization [to] guide the surgeon with visual, tactile and auditory feedback" during surgery. ...


Read More...

Anterior Hip Arthroplasty

Traditionally, hip arthroplasty, commonly known as hip replacement, has been performed by accessing the joint through the rear of the leg. Recent advances in technique, however, have made an anterior approach, during which the surgeon accesses the hip joint through the front of the leg, a more desirable option for most patients. ...


Read More...

Hip Fractures

A hip fracture is a break in the upper part of the thigh bone (femur) where the bone angles toward the hip joint. The hip is a "ball-and-socket" joint where the "ball" at the top of the thigh bone (femur) fits inside the "socket" of the pelvis (acetabulum). It allows the upper leg to bend and rotate. Most hip fractures are caused by falls or an injury from direct impact to the side of the hip. Hip fractures are more common in elderly adults as a result of osteoporosis or bones that have weakened over time. In addition to advanced age, factors such as certain medications, chronic medical conditions, or a history of heavy tobacco and alcohol use, may weaken bones and make individuals more susceptible to hip fractures. ...


Read More...

Rehabilitation After Hip Arthroplasty

Hip arthroplasty involves replacing part of the femur bone or hip socket with prosthetic devices. After surgery, a physical therapy program is created to help the patient regain flexibility, increase range of motion, and strengthen the hip and leg. The goal of physical therapy is to help patients to walk safely, without assistance, and eventually return them to all of their regular activities. ...


Read More...

Hip Procedures FAQs

As a weight-bearing ball and socket joint, the hip is prone to various ailments which may occur as a result of aging, traumatic injury or disease. Many of these require surgical intervention for diagnosis or repair.

What is hip arthroscopy?

Hip arthroscopy is a minimally invasive procedure used to diagnose and treat a wide range of conditions affecting the hip joint. During procedure, an arthroscope, a long flexible tube with a camera and a tiny light on the end, in inserted into a small incision in the hip. This device displays magnified images of the inside of the hip joint on a video monitor. This procedure can be used to confirm diagnoses with real-time observation. If any abnormalities are detected during the arthroscopy, they can corrected, using tiny surgical instruments, during the same procedure. ...


Read More...

Hip Arthroscopy

Hip arthroscopy is a minimally invasive procedure used to diagnose and treat a wide range of conditions affecting the hip joint. This procedure can be used to confirm the diagnosis of various imaging procedures, such as X-rays and MRIs, as it provides a three-dimensional, real-time image of the affected area. If damage or abnormalities are detected during the arthroscopy, repairs can often be made during the same procedure. ...


Read More...

Physical Therapy for Hip Conditions

For people experiencing pain, discomfort and limited mobility due to hip-related injuries or conditions, physical therapy may be beneficial in promoting hip function, strengthening the joint, and maximizing the patient's range of motion. For mild hip conditions, physical therapy may be sufficient to lubricate the joint, lessen pain, and ease mobility. Physical therapy is an important part of the rehabilitation process for individuals with hip-related conditions. ...


Read More...

Total Hip Resurfacing

Total hip resurfacing is a procedure that may be performed to treat patients who are suffering from advanced arthritis in the hip. During the process, only damaged cartilage is removed and a metal cap is placed over the ball portion of the hip. The procedure is similar to that of hip replacement surgery, but in a hip resurfacing, the femoral head and socket are not removed. Hip resurfacing is typically performed on young patients or patients with medical conditions that preclude full hip replacement surgery. ...


Read More...

Minimally Invasive Total Hip Arthroplasty

Total hip arthroplasty is the complete replacement of a damaged hip with a prosthetic one. This surgery is performed to relieve pain and restore function to a hip deteriorated by osteoarthritis, rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis, avascular necrosis, congenital abnormalities or traumatic injury. Total hip arthroplasty involves replacing the entire diseased joint, composed of the natural ball and socket and its protective cartilage. The damaged joint is replaced with a prosthetic hip, usually made of a metal ball and a plastic socket. ...


Read More...

Joint Reconstruction and Replacement

Because joints are in constant use, they often wear out over time due to overuse or aging. Joint reconstruction or replacement may be required to relieve the resulting pain and restore function. Most joints in the body, including the neck, shoulders, elbows, wrists, hands, hips, knees, ankles and feet, are synovial, permitting movement and articulation. When these joints suffer traumatic injury, or when the cartilage that normally protects them wears away, surgical repair or replacement may be necessary. ...


Read More...

Rehabilitation After Knee Arthroplasty

Physical therapy begins very soon after knee arthroplasty (replacement) is complete, and usually lasts for about 6 weeks. Patients are given analgesics to relieve postoperative pain sufficiently so that they can begin knee exercises as soon as possible. At first, they are encouraged to sit up and perform knee slides. Within days, or even hours, they are instructed to perform other exercises in order to regain muscle strength and flexibility. In addition, many patients are taught to use continuous passive motion devices. ...


Read More...

Physical Therapy FAQs

What is physical therapy?

Physical therapy is a treatment method for improving movement and functionality that have been compromised by age, disease or injury. Patients recover through the use of restorative exercises that focus on muscle strength, flexibility, balance, posture and coordination, and overall pain relief. Physical therapy is also designed to prevent reinjury and maximize patient quality of life. ...


Read More...

OrthoSensor%u2122 Knee Balancer

A fairly new product for alleviating pain and restoring function in the knee is an implant device called the OrthoSensor Knee Balancer.%u2122 During knee-replacement surgery, the OrthoSensor Knee Balancer monitors and provides information about the structures in the knee joint; this information ensures optimal positioning and placement of the knee implant. The most common causes of implant failure are instability, an imbalance in the soft tissues, and malalignment. The OrthoSensor Knee Balancer addresses these issues to help ensure successful knee-replacement surgery. ...


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